Invest in Myanmar - For Investors Seeking Opportunities in Myanmar
Follow:
Invest Myanmar - The Myanmar Investment Gateway
NEWS BY TOPIC
General Information about Myanmar (1)
Business (131)
FDI in Myanmar (45)
Investments (59)
Macroeconomic Data (4)
Infrastructure (4)
Financial (17)
Economy (37)
Construction (1)
Politics (29)
Real Estate (1)
Investment Legislation (3)
Sports (1)
NEWS BY SECTOR
Telecommunications (27)
Law (14)
Infrastructure (20)
Education (2)
Banking (19)
Jewellery (1)
Stock Market (2)
Agriculture (35)
Real Estate (22)
Mining and Exploration (10)
Construction (29)
Energy (47)
Textile and Fashion (10)
Tourism (23)
Information Technology (11)
Food and Beverage (13)
Electronics (3)
Waste Management (1)
Automotive (9)
Logistics (4)
Renewable Energy (0)

Dealing with the difficulties of living in Myanmar

DEALING WITH THE DIFFICULTIES OF LIVING IN MYANMAR
Date: 19/09/2013
Source: Property report
Dealing with the difficulties of living in Myanmar

Myanmar’s rapid re-engagement with the international community is attracting an increasing number of expatriates and contributing to an incredible demand for residential property. Yet as new arrivals to the country quickly discover, the same factors that make Myanmar an exciting country full of potential and opportunity also lend to challenging living conditions. - See more at: http://www.property-report.com/dealing-with-the-difficulties-of-living-in-myanmar-31571#sthash.oLvVFXUe.dpuf

The quality of infrastructure often taken for granted by many from more developed countries is lacking or unreliable in the country. Power supply issues, unclean water and enduring a tropical climate, which can manifest in unbearable heat or torrential monsoons, are a feature of daily life for the expatriate in Myanmar.

Whether seen as minor inconveniences or frustrating barriers, these matters can be mitigated somewhat by ensuring Myanmar residential property contains several important amenities. Whether these items come with the property or need to be purchased, they will make your life in Myanmar more convenient and comfortable.


Electricity Generator

The country suffers from poor electrical infrastructure, which struggles to meet increasing demand, particularly during the hot season when temperatures can climb into the 40s, resulting in frequent brownouts and power surges.

Rechargeable fans can, and should, be purchased and used in an emergency, but batteries run out after a few hours. A personal, diesel-powered electricity generator can supply enough electricity to cope with the heat and keep essential appliances running until power is restored. But it won’t be enough to run the compressor of your split system air-conditioner.


Air-conditioner and fans

Myanmar is nice and temperate during the cool season between November to February. During the hot and rainy seasons, however, an air-conditioner of some type is essential as fans will not be enough to beat the heat.

Whilst many Myanmar residential properties have air-conditioning already installed, this is not always the case. Particularly in smaller properties, the previous tenant may have installed their own air-conditioning system and, on vacating the property, dismantled the unit to take with them. Sometimes, the unit may be old, not energy efficient or functioning optimally or you may simply need to buy more units.

Air-conditioners of all varieties are widely available in stores in Myanmar’s larger towns and cities. Frequent promotions and plenty of competition means prices are reasonable, but shop around and be aware of a system of dual-pricing which some stores operate and be sure to avoid them.

The store you purchase the unit from can also recommend or assist with future servicing or repairs.

Unfortunately, the compressor won’t function during a brownout or in periods where the supply voltage is too high or low, as is sometimes the case in some parts of Yangon.

This is where fans are useful as an emergency backup cooling solution, which can be powered by your portable generator or, in the case of rechargeable fan units, the battery you charged up when you had electricity (you did remember to do that, didn’t you?).


Voltage Protection

Taking precautions when it comes to electrical safety is especially important in Myanmar. Voltage supply is irregular and power surges are frequent, and a regular yet preventable cause of fires in Myanmar properties.

This extends to protecting compressor units, such as those found in refrigerators and air-conditioners, which can be damaged by surges. Voltage protectors specifically designed for refrigerators and air-conditioners are afford and readily available in supermarkets and electrical stores throughout Myanmar, costing no more than USD8 or USD9.

As a rule of thumb, never plug an appliance directly into the wall socket of a Myanmar property. Remember that not all power points in Myanmar are earthed and, in a small number of cases, may not be wired properly or functional at all!

Beyond large appliances, consider installing a surge protector in the distribution board of your residential property. Always use an electrician to perform this task.

For desktop computers, invest in an Uninterruptable Power Supply unit and connect the unit straight to the wall socket – do not connect it to a power strip, even one with a surge protector.

Power strips of all types, price points and sockets are available in Myanmar. Cutting corners to save on cost is not advisable and may even be dangerous if you buy a poorly made unit, which may malfunction. Invest in a well-made power strip with enough sockets to meet your needs, a surge protector and built-in circuit breaker, preferably from a manufacturer based in a country with recognised electrical equipment manufacturing safety regulations.


Water safety and supply continuity

Myanmar struggles with antiquated and inadequate water supply infrastructure. This results in water scarcity or unreliable and unsafe water supply to many Myanmar properties. Myanmar’s government acknowledges these problems and steps are being taken.

Water is supplied to properties in different ways. In Yangon, many residential buildings and compounds have overhead storage tanks, which collect water from wells or rainwater, which is then pressure pumped into houses. Unfortunately, these tanks aren’t always clean and accumulate sludge, which can sometimes end up in the building’s pipework. A delay in replenishing the tank will interrupt water supply.

To deal with potential supply issues, large plastic storage tubs of water should be kept indoors, and the water changed weekly. Drinking tap water is not recommended, and for cooking purposes use purified water. At the very least, boil tap water for 10 minutes. Filtered and purified water can be purchased from many local suppliers.


Water pressure and temperature

Myanmar’s water system is not pressurised to international standards and not all Myanmar properties have hot water systems. In Myanmar’s cool season, this means starting your day with cold, low-power showers.

A home water pressure pump and shower heater are good investments and can be readily sourced in most electrical stores, whose staff can assist with installation.


Protection against insects

Myanmar is home to a large mosquito population, which can enter even the most sterilised of properties. A tennis-racket shaped bug zapper will keep them at bay, and a mosquito net will prevent evening bites or disturbances. Both items are widely available, inexpensive and effective.

By making sure your residential property has these amenities, you can mitigate the difficulties posed by the country’s infrastructure issues and enjoy life in Myanmar.

- See more at: http://www.property-report.com/dealing-with-the-difficulties-of-living-in-myanmar-31571#sthash.oLvVFXUe.dpuf


Topic: Economy
Did You Know?
The voltage throughout Myanmar is 220-230 Volts AC. Most of the international class hotels in Yangon have their own generators. However in other places, voltage varies greatly and power often goes out. Valuable or... ... More

Featured news story
From Burma to Myanmar: Land of rising expectations
From Burma to Myanmar: Land of rising expectations

Featured Video
In Race to Develop Myanmar, Government Grabs Farmland - Invest Myanmar.biz video
In Race to Develop Myanmar, Government Grabs Farmland

COUNTRY SNAPSHOT
GDP 2010 USD 45.4 B
GDP 2012 USD 54.0 B
Inflation 9.13 %
Unemployment Approx. 35%
GDP growth 2011 5.5 %
FDI 2011 USD 1.05 B
Today on Invest Myanmar
Member Companies: 82
News Stories: 341
Myanmar Videos: 59
Interesting Facts: 29
Factsheets: 9
 © Copyrighted 2012 Invest Myanmar.biz. All rights reserved.  

 
Please read Conditions of Use, Copyright Statement and Privacy Policy for this web page and web site.



Crafted by Sofia Web Works®, makers of Pahraat Kasinot and Casinobonus på alla svenska online casinon an Invest Bulgaria company